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  • Failed valve stem

    Well, had another fun adventure with the Missus today in the Jeep. We were driving home on the 210 while it was pouring rain. Felt the vehicle pulling hard to the left. Stuck my head out the window and saw it was flat. Crap.

    Pulled the flat and had it replaced with the spare in the rain all the while with semi's thundering by my ass.

    I looked over the tire at home for a leak. 0 PSI, I figured it would be a huge screw or something. No. The valve stem base had cracked. Good news as the MTR is still intact.

    Well, now, I want to fix this myself, but I don't want to ever have this happen again either. I'd like to avoid the no-name Kragen's valve stems as I am sure they will disintegrate in no time. The flush fit stems seem a bit pricey and need the special nipple to inflate. I guess a short stem would be preferable.

    Are there any quality rubber stems or should I go with metal? Deb's metal stems tend to leak quite a bit unless the locking nut is really cranked down.

    Also is there any way I can insert the stem without having to break the bead and get my fingers in the rim?

    OK, thanks in advance. Valve stem mods aren't too sexy, but I'd like to learn how to do this now as I am sure it happens quite a bit on the trail!
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    2003 TJ Rubicon: 4.5" OME coils; RE SF2; NthDegree TT/oilpan skid/shock shifters; FXD rock rails; Anti-Rock; 5150'

  • #2
    I'm not sure what to suggest for new stems. I don't have any experience with anything other than the basic 1.25" rubber ones.

    as far as replacing it... Blaine has a fancy gadget that pushes the stem in from the outside. If you drove out to the desert this weekend we could do it there. Maybe I can talk Blaine into letting me borrow it. I could stop by on my way home Sunday. Or you break the bead and insert it from the inside.

    my :2:
    myJeeprocks.com

    "in the end... the rocks always win."

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    • #3
      hmm interesting. I wonder how much that tool costs and where I could buy it. I guess replacing with inexpensive stems in a convenient fashion would be a good way to approach the problem.

      The only tools for valve placement have been screw-on fishing tools that allow one to pull the valve through the rim from the inside. Shooting them in from the outside would be great.
      Last edited by jmbrowning; 03-23-05, 07:23 AM.
      Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
      2003 TJ Rubicon: 4.5" OME coils; RE SF2; NthDegree TT/oilpan skid/shock shifters; FXD rock rails; Anti-Rock; 5150'

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jmbrowning
        Are there any quality rubber stems or should I go with metal? Deb's metal stems tend to leak quite a bit unless the locking nut is really cranked down.
        I had the fancy metal valve stems until a rock flipped over just the wrong way and broke one off - so I went back to the cheapo rubber ones
        "your jeep looks so hot!!"

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        • #5
          I believe it was a tool for the military. I have searched but could find no info on such a tool on-line. I don't think one can be purchased at this time.

          I have heard that someone may be designing something similar for public purchase. Not sure when that may be availabe though.

          <edit> if you find one somewhere... buy 2!!!!:yay:</edit>
          myJeeprocks.com

          "in the end... the rocks always win."

          Comment


          • #6
            Gosh I just read about some rock solid stems that were hold up to rockcrawling... Ill see if I can find where the heck I saw them and re-post...

            Ok... update... Here is a set of Solid Brass.. They are fairly new on the market and are made of 100% solid brass. (they used to use a plastic valve but that is now brass too). They are made by Staun.. They are also a Rapid Air Down Valve so it makes airing down tires much faster.


            Staun Tyre Deflators

            Klune V also makes a RAD (Rapid Air Down) Valve. They were the First RAD if I am not mistaken...

            Klune V RAD

            Hope this helps,
            Last edited by 4x4garage; 03-25-05, 01:45 PM.
            Scott Poliseno
            www.4x4garage.com

            The trouble with political jokes is that very often they get elected.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by blkTJ
              I believe it was a tool for the military. I have searched but could find no info on such a tool on-line. I don't think one can be purchased at this time.

              I have heard that someone may be designing something similar for public purchase. Not sure when that may be availabe though.

              <edit> if you find one somewhere... buy 2!!!!:yay:</edit>
              I have the means and parts to develop a modern version of a stem insertion tool. My fear is that as soon as I sink a bit of development cash into it and then put them up for sale, someone will post a link to the long lost supply that no one's been able to find for 10 years.

              Keep looking and let me know if anyone finds some, otherwise I will be starting the development soon.
              I am Savvy.

              Comment


              • #8
                I would be interested in one of these tools.I am a bit spoiled with a pair of old Coats tire machines(a 20-20 at my dads and a 30-30 being refurbished for my house).One of these tools would be damned handy!
                "Good Girls and Dirty Jeeps" a song by Opal Justice http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xRtRE45OVQ

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                • #9
                  since I figure it's killin' you guys... here's what the thing looks like in action...



                  a note to all you guys in the military... if you see one of these things sitting around the motor pool, steal it!!!!
                  myJeeprocks.com

                  "in the end... the rocks always win."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mrblaine
                    I have the means and parts to develop a modern version of a stem insertion tool. My fear is that as soon as I sink a bit of development cash into it and then put them up for sale, someone will post a link to the long lost supply that no one's been able to find for 10 years.

                    Keep looking and let me know if anyone finds some, otherwise I will be starting the development soon.
                    Is there a NSN on it or name of a manufacturer or other ID on the tool? If I can get the NSN, it's a simple task to look it up and order it.
                    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
                    2003 TJ Rubicon: 4.5" OME coils; RE SF2; NthDegree TT/oilpan skid/shock shifters; FXD rock rails; Anti-Rock; 5150'

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jmbrowning
                      Is there a NSN on it or name of a manufacturer or other ID on the tool? If I can get the NSN, it's a simple task to look it up and order it.

                      There is no indication of a National Stocking Number or any other identifying marks, company logos or trademarks anywhere on the tool.

                      Someone posted a link a few years back to a guy selling them and my partner bought what he was told was the last one. So far, that has been a true statement.
                      I am Savvy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Does it looks like something that could be reversed engineered?

                        I am thinking that if enough people go in on it, we could just have some made. It sounds like a valuable enough tool it would be worth $100-200 to me to have one made.
                        Michael

                        [sign]nlm mln[/sign]

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                        • #13
                          Finally replaced the tire valve

                          Well, got tired of looking at that flat tire in the corner of the garage and decided to do something about it. Went to PepBoys and got a couple of 1.25" length tire valves and a cool little tire valve fishing tool that also removes cores and acts as a tire deflator.


                          First, remove the valve core and deflate the tire. Even with a crack in the valve stem, the tire retained quite a bit of pressure.


                          I was tempted to just rip the confounded tire valve out, but I asked myself "What Would Sarah Do?" and patiently used the Hi-Lift against the rocker guard to break the bead of the tire.


                          I am glad I didn't just rip the valve out as the valve tore at the flange and dropped on to the tire bead. If I had not broken the bead first, the flange would have fallen into the rim and much cussing and wrestling would have ensued.


                          I used the fishing tool to pull the new valve into the rim. I had contemplated using metal valves, but I didn't feel like deburring the rim to get a good gasket seal and the metal valves cost 5x the cheapo rubber valves.


                          A gentle tug of the fishing tool and the new valve was installed. That tool made valve insertion slicker than willie. Not quite as cool as shooting it into the rim from outside but a close fourth or fifth.


                          This picture is cropped a bit so you don't have to see the mess my garage is in right now (you need to be married to me to have that honor). Anyways, to ensure that the tire inflates laterally against the bead rather than leaking air everywhere, I used a ratchet strap around the tire. Not so tight that the tread buckled, but just one or two notches tighter than snug. I considered using starter fluid to pop the bead back on but it was late and whenever I do stupid stuff at home when the Missus is out, I end up paying for it in the end. The tire snapped back on without rotating on the rim and therefore will not need any rebalancing (I hope).

                          For a few bucks and minimal amount of space, I'll be carrying along a couple of spare tire valves and that fishing tool whenever wheeling. The Hi-Lift makes a fine tire bead breaker as long as you mind the corners of the base (don't want any sidewall tears).

                          That was fun and only took about fifteen minutes with breaks for chatting on the phone and taking pictures.
                          Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
                          2003 TJ Rubicon: 4.5" OME coils; RE SF2; NthDegree TT/oilpan skid/shock shifters; FXD rock rails; Anti-Rock; 5150'

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            glad you got it taken care of Ted.

                            Now, imagine having to do that about 12 times in the last 6 months. That's why I like the fancy tool so much. If Blaine didn't have so much on his plate already, I'd be bugging him daily about a new prototype.
                            myJeeprocks.com

                            "in the end... the rocks always win."

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